About

IMG_0017 My name is Lauren Stewart and I teach chemistry and med-tech chemistry at a comprehensive high school in Ohio. My teaching philosophy is science comes from experiments, not from textbooks. Less lectures, less tests, more learning.

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8 responses to “About

  1. Lauren,
    Love the blogs! I came across your blog as an email and wow, facing same experiences. Although not a modeler, I whiteboard, I do particulate, I involve lots of inquiry. Again thanks for posting and look forward to reading more! Curious if you had a write up on the medicine bottle sink density practicing! Been looking to move away from the blocks to more of a challenge for my students!
    Again thanks
    Doug

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    • Doug,
      Thanks for the compliments! I do not have a write-up for the density practicum. I simply give my students a pill bottle and a bag of sand and tell them to determine how much sand they need to add to the pill bottle to get it to be at least 90% submerged in the water tank. I tell the students they can use whatever measuring tools they want and set them loose. To get them started, I tell them to think about the question, “what makes something sink or float in water?” I usually let them struggle a while before I go around and ask questions to set them on the right track if they are completely lost. I like this activity because it can be as guided or as open ended as you want!
      -Lauren

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  2. Matthew Casella

    Hello!
    I found your blog a few months ago and have been following it closely. I am wrapping up my very first semester of Chem modeling, and about to start the second in a few weeks with a brand new group of students. I’ve enjoyed your posts (especially the unit summaries).

    You have a lot of great ideas and alterations to the AMTA core chem curriculum! I was wondering if you would be so kind as to share some of the doc’s/etc. you’ve created with me? I really like what you have done with your first unit especially.

    Thanks for publishing your progress! I look forward to your future posts.

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    • Thanks for your compliments! I would love to share some of my materials with you. All of my materials are on Google Drive so if you give me an email associated with a Google account, I can just share my Unit 1 stuff that way.

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  3. Isabella M. Yearwood

    I am really intrigued by how you are carrying out SBG, I was very skeptical of it, but it seems like you have an answer to most of my concerns! I would really like to begin piloting in one of my classes next semester, but I had a few questions.

    1. How do you determine whether they, got it, almost or not yet? Do you for example create a rubric for every assessment and say if they got 4-6 correct out of 10 they are almost?

    2. Some of your targets combine skills, for example, I can name and write formulas for ionic compounds. What if they “got” naming but not writing? Do you like how that is working out, or would you separate them? I’m trying to write learning targets now and I am struggling because I either make them too general or too specific.

    Thanks!

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  4. Hi Lauren!

    I am new to the Modeling Chemistry curriculum and standards-based grading and I have been following your blogs very closely! Due to budgetary reasons, I have not gone to a workshop for Modeling Chemistry yet, but we did buy the materials and I’ve been going about it in my own way and also using a lot of your great ideas! I was wondering if you could share some of your materials with me? Everything you do is amazing, and it has definitely made a difference in my classroom this year! Let me know…thanks again for all of your hard work!

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  5. Lauren, I recently viewed the modeling chemistry webinar from 2016 on AMTA. They share your unit 0-3 google drive folders with the participants. They mentioned your units 4-8, but didn’t share those. Is there anyway you would be willing to share those with me or share through through AMTA somehow. I have found your units 0-3 very useful.

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